“Kindness” is our middle name – literally.

We call ourselves the Chicago Chesed Fund because Chesed is the Hebrew word for kindness, and that’s what we are all about.

For 25 years, we’ve remained committed to helping Jewish families in crisis throughout metropolitan Chicago by providing immediate assistance.  

We opened our doors in 1987 with food distribution and financial assistance programs to 35 families. 

Today, our more than 20 programs and services provide vital assistance to over 3,000 individuals a year. Our original budget of $100,000 has since grown to over $4 million.

shoesOur 44,000-square-foot “warehouse of kindness” in Lincolnwood has served as our headquarters since 2005. We offer a wide array of programs and services, aimed at battling hunger, preventing eviction and homelessness, and providing needy families with basics such as furniture and clothing. Our flagship program is our food pantry, which has helped us become one of the largest food distribution centers in northern Cook county. 

We aren’t just another social services organization. 

Our response is immediate, coming only hours after a request for assistance is made. 

We realize the importance of maintaining our clients’ dignity, and offer assistance with sensitivity and discretion.  

We are dedicated to addressing the specific cultural needs of the Chicago Jewish community – such as the need for kosher food, a Jewish education, and access to culturally appropriate care and resources.

Today, the Chicago Chesed Fund serves Jewish families throughout the city of Chicago, primarily in the Rogers Park, Peterson Park, and Albany Park neighborhoods, and some northern suburbs. 

Over the last quarter of a century, we’ve made a real difference in the lives of hundreds of Jewish families throughout the city of Chicago. We’ve helped them put food on the table, clothe their children and pay their mortgage – and get back on the road to self-sufficiency. 

In short, we’ve helped strengthen the very fabric of our Jewish community.

Yet, in recent years, the economic climate has led to a significant increase in demand for our services.  Even as we continue to expand to meet this need, we remain true to the vision of our founders – to offer personalized, immediate assistance to those in need.

To learn more about our services or to volunteer please visit our website: www.chicagochesedfund.org

Call our main number 847-679-7799
for:

Car donations

General donations

Food Pantry

Food Porch Family G'mach – Clothing, Books, Toys, Baby Equipment

Housewares

Interest-Free Loans  

Furniture

Simcha Link Matchmaking Service www.simchalink.org

For other services, please call these direct numbers:

Eviction Prevention (Arevim) 

773-242-9318 / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Job Link  

773-866-1111 /www.joblinkchicago.org

Linen (Bed, Bath and Chesed)  

847-675-2154 

Medical Supplies (Routberg Memorial)  

773-761-4624

Bridal Gowns & Headpieces (Ateres Chaya)  

773-267-7174

Bridal Showers (Ginot Shoshana)  

847-982-0562

Centerpieces (Prop-A-Party)  

773-778-7205

Chair & Table Lend (Simcha Lend)  

773-539-5991

Crinoline G'mach  

773-262-0799

Gowns Rentals for Immediate Family (Jane Webster Simcha Boutique)  

773-539-1069

Maternity Gown G'mach  

773-338-6361 

, for:

 

 

 

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Re'eh

Moshe presents to the nation the blessing of a spiritually oriented life and the curse of becoming disconnected from HaShem. When the nation enters Erets Yisrael they must burn down any trees that had been used for idol- worship, and destroy all idolatrous statues. HaShem will choose only one place where the Divine Presence will dwell. Offerings may be brought only there; not to a private altar. Moshe repeatedly warns against eating animal blood. In the desert, all meat was slaughtered in the Mishkan, but in Erets Yisrael meat may be slaughtered anywhere. The categories of foods that may only be eaten in Jerusalem are listed by Moshe. He warns the nation against copying ways of the other nations. Since the Torah is complete and perfect, nothing may be added or subtracted from it. If a false prophet tells the people to permanently abandon a Torah law or indulge in idol worship, he is to be put to death. One who entices others to worship idols is to be put to death. A city of idolatry must be razed. It is prohibited to show excessive signs of mourning, such as marking the skin or making a bald spot between the eyes. Moshe reiterates the classifications of kosher and non-kosher food and the prohibition of cooking meat and milk. Produce of the second tithe must be eaten in Jerusalem, and if the amount is too large to carry, it may be exchanged for money with which food is bought in Jerusalem. In certain years this tithe is given to the poor. Beney Yisrael are instructed to always be open- hearted, and in the seventh year any loans must be discounted -- HaShem will bless the person in all ways. A Jewish bondsman is released after six years, and must be sent away with generous provisions. If he refuses to leave, his ear is pierced with an awl at the door post, and he remains a bondsman until the Jubilee year. The Parashah ends with a description of the three pilgrimage festivals of Pesach, Shavuot and Sukot.


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