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Heritage Newsletter
Shabbos Information
This week`s Torah chapter is BeShalach

This Friday, January 18 Mincha will be at 4:35 PM

Candle lighting will be at 4:30 PM

Kidush is sponsored by Polina Imas on the occasion of Isabel`s birthday.

Mincha on Shabbos, January 19 will be at 4:20 PM

Maariv will be at 5:31 PM

Shabbos ends at 5:41 PM
Weekly Torah
Pharaoh finally sends the Beney Yisrael out of Egypt. HaShem leads the Jewish People towards Erets Yisrael with pillars of clouds and fire on a circuitous route which avoids the Plishtim (Philistines).

Pharaoh regrets the loss of so many slaves and chases the Jews with his army. The Beney Yisrael are very afraid as the Egyptians draw close, but HaShem protects them. Moshe raises his staff, and HaShem splits the sea, enabling the Beney Yisrael to cross safely.

Pharaoh, his heart hardened by HaShem, commands his army to pursue the Beney Yisrael, whereupon the waters crash down upon the Egyptian army. Moshe and Miryam lead the men and women, respectively, in song thanking HaShem. After travelling for three days only to find bitter waters at Marah, the people start to complain. Moshe miraculously produces potable water for them, and in Marah they receive certain mitsvot. The people complain to Moshe and Aharon that they had better food in Egypt. HaShem sends quails so they can have meat and provides the `Manna` for them. It is a miraculous bread that falls from the heavens every day except on Shabat. However, on Friday a double portion descends to supply the Sabbath needs. Nobody is able to obtain more than his daily portion, but Manna collected on Friday suffices for two days so the Jews can rest on Shabat. Some of the Manna is set aside as a memorial for future generations. After the Jews complain again about the lack of water, Moshe miraculously produces water from a rock. Amalek then attacks the Jews. Joshua leads the battle while Moshe prays for their welfare.

Birthdays
Ester Leah Volinsky
January 17
Ariel Aharon Turik
January 19
Rochel Gertsberg
January 22
Isabel Kucher
January 23
Yahrzeit
David Dimarsky
Dovid ben Eliezer
January 24
Moshe Fintushal
Moshe ben Avraham
January 18
Yosef Peisin
Yosef ben Dvora
January 21
Malka Turetskaya
Malka bas Yakov
January 21
Fenya Yelkonovich
Fenya bas Michael
January 19
Shabbos Halacha

Shabbat Kiddush: Kos Pagum

Do not use a kos pagum for kiddush. Kos pagum means either:

  • “Physically damaged or broken drinking utensil":   (You may not use such a cup for kiddush l`chatchila), OR
  • Cup of wine, grape juice, or any beverage that has been drunk from. 

This beverage may not be used for a kos shel bracha until at least a small amount more of some beverage has been added to the existing beverage.

Shalva

SHALVA provides the following services to domestic violence victims and their families:

24 hour crisis line

Culturally sensitive individual and group counseling

Legal information & court support

Financial assistance

Rabbinical & community advocacy & training

Information & referrals

Community prevention & educational programs

Mission Statement

SHALVA's mission is to address domestic abuse in Jewish homes and relationships through counseling and education.

Core Values

The following reflect our core values that are the never-changing definition of who we are and what we stand for. They are the underpinnings of our organizational culture.

SHALVA's philosophy and services are rooted in Jewish values.

Maintaining the strictest level of safety and confidentiality

Providing high-quality services in a supportive environment

Being physically and financially accessible to all Jewish abuse victims

Serving all clients with the utmost sensitivity to their religious observance

Helping clients regain their dignity and sense of self

Founded in 1986, SHALVA provides free domestic abuse crisis-counseling for adult women in the Chicago Jewish community.

"We believe that every Jewish woman has the right to be safe in her personal relationship with her partner."

Agency Overview

SHALVA is the oldest independent Jewish domestic abuse agency in the United States and has been instrumental in facilitating national and international dialogues on the specific needs of Jewish families experiencing domestic violence. SHALVA carries out its mission by working to create "a zero tolerance" for domestic abuse in the Jewish community.

SHALVA'S first executive director was Sherry Dimarsky. In 1986, SHALVA's first year of existence, 24 clients were served. Since then, SHALVA has worked with over 4,000 clients from every denomination of Judaism that seek assistance for domestic abuse. Over the years, SHALVA has grown to include free counseling services in the form of crisis-counseling, ongoing individual, support and educational groups.

SHALVA works in partnership with domestic abuse agencies throughout the Chicago metropolitan area to increase awareness around culturally-specific Jewish issues and to serve as a resource specializing in Chicago's Jewish population. SHALVA's community education programs reach more than 3,400 people annually throughout the Jewish community and our newsletter is sent to over 19,500 homes biannually. Since 1986, SHALVA volunteers and staff have educated thousands of individuals about violence in Jewish relationships. SHALVA staff trains Rabbis, police officers, hospital social workers, camp counselors, teachers, friends and family of victims in order to increase education and community awareness about domestic abuse, to inform the public about SHALVA's counseling and education services, and to promote advocacy around the issue of domestic abuse.

 

Contact Us

Tel #: 773-583-HOPE (4673)

Fax #: 847-674-0180

Website: www.shalvaonline.org

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 46375

Chicago, IL 60646-0375

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)