SHALVA provides the following services to domestic violence victims and their families:

24 hour crisis line

Culturally sensitive individual and group counseling

Legal information & court support

Financial assistance

Rabbinical & community advocacy & training

Information & referrals

Community prevention & educational programs

Mission Statement

SHALVA's mission is to address domestic abuse in Jewish homes and relationships through counseling and education.

Core Values

The following reflect our core values that are the never-changing definition of who we are and what we stand for. They are the underpinnings of our organizational culture.

SHALVA's philosophy and services are rooted in Jewish values.

Maintaining the strictest level of safety and confidentiality

Providing high-quality services in a supportive environment

Being physically and financially accessible to all Jewish abuse victims

Serving all clients with the utmost sensitivity to their religious observance

Helping clients regain their dignity and sense of self

Founded in 1986, SHALVA provides free domestic abuse crisis-counseling for adult women in the Chicago Jewish community.

"We believe that every Jewish woman has the right to be safe in her personal relationship with her partner."

Agency Overview

SHALVA is the oldest independent Jewish domestic abuse agency in the United States and has been instrumental in facilitating national and international dialogues on the specific needs of Jewish families experiencing domestic violence. SHALVA carries out its mission by working to create "a zero tolerance" for domestic abuse in the Jewish community.

SHALVA'S first executive director was Sherry Dimarsky. In 1986, SHALVA's first year of existence, 24 clients were served. Since then, SHALVA has worked with over 4,000 clients from every denomination of Judaism that seek assistance for domestic abuse. Over the years, SHALVA has grown to include free counseling services in the form of crisis-counseling, ongoing individual, support and educational groups.

SHALVA works in partnership with domestic abuse agencies throughout the Chicago metropolitan area to increase awareness around culturally-specific Jewish issues and to serve as a resource specializing in Chicago's Jewish population. SHALVA's community education programs reach more than 3,400 people annually throughout the Jewish community and our newsletter is sent to over 19,500 homes biannually. Since 1986, SHALVA volunteers and staff have educated thousands of individuals about violence in Jewish relationships. SHALVA staff trains Rabbis, police officers, hospital social workers, camp counselors, teachers, friends and family of victims in order to increase education and community awareness about domestic abuse, to inform the public about SHALVA's counseling and education services, and to promote advocacy around the issue of domestic abuse.

 

Contact Us

Tel #: 773-583-HOPE (4673)

Fax #: 847-674-0180

Website: www.shalvaonline.org

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 46375

Chicago, IL 60646-0375

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) 

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Re'eh

Moshe presents to the nation the blessing of a spiritually oriented life and the curse of becoming disconnected from HaShem. When the nation enters Erets Yisrael they must burn down any trees that had been used for idol- worship, and destroy all idolatrous statues. HaShem will choose only one place where the Divine Presence will dwell. Offerings may be brought only there; not to a private altar. Moshe repeatedly warns against eating animal blood. In the desert, all meat was slaughtered in the Mishkan, but in Erets Yisrael meat may be slaughtered anywhere. The categories of foods that may only be eaten in Jerusalem are listed by Moshe. He warns the nation against copying ways of the other nations. Since the Torah is complete and perfect, nothing may be added or subtracted from it. If a false prophet tells the people to permanently abandon a Torah law or indulge in idol worship, he is to be put to death. One who entices others to worship idols is to be put to death. A city of idolatry must be razed. It is prohibited to show excessive signs of mourning, such as marking the skin or making a bald spot between the eyes. Moshe reiterates the classifications of kosher and non-kosher food and the prohibition of cooking meat and milk. Produce of the second tithe must be eaten in Jerusalem, and if the amount is too large to carry, it may be exchanged for money with which food is bought in Jerusalem. In certain years this tithe is given to the poor. Beney Yisrael are instructed to always be open- hearted, and in the seventh year any loans must be discounted -- HaShem will bless the person in all ways. A Jewish bondsman is released after six years, and must be sent away with generous provisions. If he refuses to leave, his ear is pierced with an awl at the door post, and he remains a bondsman until the Jubilee year. The Parashah ends with a description of the three pilgrimage festivals of Pesach, Shavuot and Sukot.


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