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Meet Rabbi David Lagunov, our guest speaker for Shalosh Seudos

He was born and grew up in secular family in Moscow. Of course, I identified myself as a jew, but it meant almost nothing to me. Once in a year we ate matza, but with bread, and that’s all. Until 6th grade I went to regular school in Moscow. Then new neighbors who moved to our building advised me to go to jewish summer camp, and after camp I decided to go to the jewish school, that was at 1995.

 Influenced by rabbi Goldschmidt and his wife, during 2 years of learning in school, I’ve got closer to Judaism. I continued my learning in jewish Academy in Copenhagen, Denmark. After 2 years of learning there I went to USA to learn in yeshiva and finished high school there. Then I stayed to learn in Rabbi Jacob Joseph School in New Jersey.

 Then for 1 year I learnt in yeshiva in Israel and when I got back to US I continued my education in the biggest religious study center of US - Beth Medrash Govoha in Lakewood New Jersey for 5 years.

 6 years ago I met my wife Esther, who was born in New York in family of Russian emigrants from Moscow. Her parents were not observant, but in US they made tshuva, more than 30 years ago, so Esty was privileged to grow up in religious traditions. We have 4 wonderful kids.

 2 years ago we moved to Moscow to teach Tora and jewish tradition in few learning centers: Etz Haim school, where my jewish identification has started, in TSERO “Tora MiTzion” and in yeshiva “Ohaley Yakov”. My wife also teaches girls on “STARS-intensive” in TSERO “Tora MiTzion”.


This Shabbos is national Shmiras haLoshon Awareness Shabbos

learn more here

The Shabbos Table Machsom L’fi (muzzle to your mouth) takes the concept of a Machsom L’fi and uses it to enhance and uplift every Shabbos meal.

A Machsom L’fi is a program in which people commit themselves to focusing for a set period of time each day on the proper use of their power of speech as defined in the Torah. During that time, they concentrate on avoiding speaking and hearing loshon hora, gossip, slander, ona’as devarim (hurtful words), or any other form of angry or negative expression. Often, a Machsom L’fi is undertaken as a zechus for someone who is in need of refuah, a shidduch, children, parnassah or a personal yeshuah.

Shalva

SHALVA provides the following services to domestic violence victims and their families:

24 hour crisis line

Culturally sensitive individual and group counseling

Legal information & court support

Financial assistance

Rabbinical & community advocacy & training

Information & referrals

Community prevention & educational programs

Mission Statement

SHALVA's mission is to address domestic abuse in Jewish homes and relationships through counseling and education.

Core Values

The following reflect our core values that are the never-changing definition of who we are and what we stand for. They are the underpinnings of our organizational culture.

SHALVA's philosophy and services are rooted in Jewish values.

Maintaining the strictest level of safety and confidentiality

Providing high-quality services in a supportive environment

Being physically and financially accessible to all Jewish abuse victims

Serving all clients with the utmost sensitivity to their religious observance

Helping clients regain their dignity and sense of self

Founded in 1986, SHALVA provides free domestic abuse crisis-counseling for adult women in the Chicago Jewish community.

"We believe that every Jewish woman has the right to be safe in her personal relationship with her partner."

Agency Overview

SHALVA is the oldest independent Jewish domestic abuse agency in the United States and has been instrumental in facilitating national and international dialogues on the specific needs of Jewish families experiencing domestic violence. SHALVA carries out its mission by working to create "a zero tolerance" for domestic abuse in the Jewish community.

SHALVA'S first executive director was Sherry Dimarsky. In 1986, SHALVA's first year of existence, 24 clients were served. Since then, SHALVA has worked with over 4,000 clients from every denomination of Judaism that seek assistance for domestic abuse. Over the years, SHALVA has grown to include free counseling services in the form of crisis-counseling, ongoing individual, support and educational groups.

SHALVA works in partnership with domestic abuse agencies throughout the Chicago metropolitan area to increase awareness around culturally-specific Jewish issues and to serve as a resource specializing in Chicago's Jewish population. SHALVA's community education programs reach more than 3,400 people annually throughout the Jewish community and our newsletter is sent to over 19,500 homes biannually. Since 1986, SHALVA volunteers and staff have educated thousands of individuals about violence in Jewish relationships. SHALVA staff trains Rabbis, police officers, hospital social workers, camp counselors, teachers, friends and family of victims in order to increase education and community awareness about domestic abuse, to inform the public about SHALVA's counseling and education services, and to promote advocacy around the issue of domestic abuse.

 

Contact Us

Tel #: 773-583-HOPE (4673)

Fax #: 847-674-0180

Website: www.shalvaonline.org

Mailing Address:

P.O. Box 46375

Chicago, IL 60646-0375

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)